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Tuesday, July 16, 2019

 

The Sky This Week - Thursday July 18 to Thursday July 25

The Last Quarter Moon is Thursday, July 25. 50th anniversary of Apollo Moon landings, Saturday, July 20. Mars is just visible low in the evening twilight at the beginning of the week then is lost in the twilight.  Jupiter is easily visible as the brightest object in the evening skies. Saturn, just past opposition, is high in the late evening skies.

The Last Quarter Moon is Thursday, July 25.  The Moon is at apogee, when it is furthest from the Earth, on the 21st.

Sky at 18:54 ACST (90 minutes after sunset)on Saturday, July 20 looking east as seen from Adelaide. Jupiter is past opposition, and high above the eastern horizon with the Moon nearby. Saturn is below the pair and just past opposition.

The left upper insert inset shows the telescopic
view of Jupiter at this time. Europa is about to transit the disk of Jupiter. The left lower insert is the telescopic view of Saturn at the same magnification.

Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia 90 minutes after sunset, click to embiggen.


Sky at 20:00 ACST on Saturday, July 20 looking east as seen from Adelaide.The Moon is reasonably high above the horizon.  As this is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing try looking for the apollo 11 landing site.

The inset is the telescopic/binocular view at this time. The Apollo landing site is indicated with a star, near a promontory not far from an obvious crater chain.


Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time, click to embiggen.






Venus is lost in the morning twilight and will return to the evening sky in September.

Mercury  is lost in the twilight returning to the morning sky next month.

Jupiter  Jupiter is now well past opposition. However, it is still well worth observing. Jupiter is easily visible as the brightest object in the north-eastern/northern sky (aside from the Moon) and is located just below the distinctive constellation of Scorpius and the bright red star Antares. It is visible all evening long and is a good telescope target in the evening, being highest above the northern horizon around 9:30 pm local time.

Mars is in Cancer and very close to the horizon at the beginning of the week then is lost in the twilight.

Saturn  climbs was at opposition on the 10th, when it was visible all night long. Saturn is below Jupiter and just below the "handle" of the "teapot of Sagittarius. It is best for
 telescopic viewing from just around 9 pm local time until the early morning and is highest above the northern horizon, when it is idea for telescopic imaging, shortly after midnight.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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Don't forget: Twilight Partial Lunar Eclipse on the Morning of July 17th

Morning sky on July 17 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 07:00 ACST, at maximum eclipse. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen). The darkening of the Moon will be readily visible.

On the morning of July 17, there is a partial eclipse of the Moon. This is a reasonable partial eclipse which favours Western Australia and the Central states, and though you have to get up early in the morning to see it. Eastern Australians may wish to stay in bed as it is a weekday and most of the eclipse is in twilight for them.

For more details, timings and charts, see my partial lunar eclipse page

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Tuesday, July 09, 2019

 

Twilight Partial Lunar Eclipse (Morning July 17th)

Western horizon as seen from Melbourne on  17 July at 7:02 am AEST. The eclipse is 30 minutes from maximum extent. The inset shows the telescopic/binocular view at this time. Click to embiggenWestern horizon as seen from Adelaide on  17 July at 7:00 am ACST. The eclipse is at maximum extent. The inset shows the telescopic/binocular view at this time. Click to embiggenWestern horizon as seen from Perth on 17 July at 5:30 am AWST. The eclipse is at maximum extent. The inset shows the telescopic/binocular view at this time. Click to embiggen

On the morning of Wednesday 17 July there will be the a twilight partial eclipse of the Moon.

The 17 July eclipse starts after twilight has begun in the eastern states, with maximum eclipse after sunrise and the Moon low to the horizon. In the central states the eclipse starts just before astronomical twilight when the sky is fully dark, with maximal eclipse just before civil twilight and the Moon low to the western horizon. In Western Australia most of the eclipse occurs when the sky is quite dark and the Moon is reasonably high for most f the eclipse as well . See timings table below.

Although the eclipse is only partial around half the Moon is covered in the deepest shadow.  In the eastern and central states a lot of the eclipse is in twilight, but even twilight eclipses look amazing.

You don't need special filters or fancy equipment to watch the lunar eclipse, you just need your eyes and somewhere comfortable to sit and watch. Watching earth's shadow creep across the Moons face, as the stars begin to appear again is quite beautiful. The moon is very obvious to the west. Binoculars or a telescope are a plus, but not necessary.

A guide I wrote for the October 2014 lunar eclipse to taking photos of the eclipse is here.

See here for a map and contact timings in Universal Time for sites outside Australia

States Astronomical twilight (approx) Nautical twilight
(approx)
Civil  Twilight Eclipse Start Maximum Eclipse Sunrise Moonset Eclipse End
Eastern 5:59 am 6:30 am 7:02 am 6:00 am 7:31 am 7:31 am 7:38 am 9:00 am
Central 5:51 am 6:22 am 6:53  am 5:31 am 7:01 am 7:20 am 7:27 am 8:30 am
Western 5:49 am 6:18 am 6:48 am 4:01 am 5:31 am 7:15 am 7:34 am 07:00 am

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The Sky This Week - Thursday July 11 to Thursday July 18

The Full Moon is Wednesday, July 17. There is a partial lunar eclipse on the morning of the 17th. Mars is visible low in the evening twilight with Mercury below it briefly before Mercury vanishes in the twilight.  Jupiter is easily visible as the brightest object in the evening skies and is visited by the Moon on the 13th. Saturn, just past opposition, is high in the late evening skies and is visted by the Moon on the 16th.  Venus is lost in the twilight glow.

The Full Moon is Wednesday, July 17. There is a partial lunar eclipse on the morning of the 17th.

Evening sky on Saturday, July 13  as seen looking north-west from Adelaide at 18:20 ACST (60 minutes after sunset). Mars is close to the horizon. Mercury is lost in the twilight.





Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes after sunset, click to embiggen).


Sky at 20:00 ACST on Saturday, July 13 looking east as seen from Adelaide. Jupiter is past opposition, and high above the eastern horizon with the Moon nearby. Saturn is below the pair and just past opposition.

The left upper insert inset shows the telescopic
view of Jupiter at this time. Europa is about to transit the disk of Jupiter. The left lower insert is the telescopic view of Saturn at the same magnification.

Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time, click to embiggen.

Morning sky on July 17 looking east as seen from Adelaide at 07:00 ACST, at maximum eclipse. Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time. (click to embiggen). The darkening of the Moon will be readily visible.

On the morning of July 17, there is a partial eclipse of the Moon. This is a reasonable partial eclipse which favours western Australia and the Central states, and though you have to get up early in the morning to see it, so Eastern Australians may wish to stay in bed as it is a week day and most of the eclipse is in twilight for them.

For more details, timings and charts, see my partial lunar eclipse page.






Venus is lost in the morning twilight and will return to the evening sky in September.

Mercury  is lost in the twilight.

Jupiter  Jupiter is now well past opposition. However, it is still well worth observing. Jupiter is easily visible as the brightest object in the north-eastern/northern sky (aside from the Moon) and is located just below the distinctive constellation of Scorpius and the bright red star Antares. It is visible all evening long and is a good telescope target in the evening, being highest above the northern horizon around 10:00 pm local time.The Moon is close to Jupiter on the 13th

Mars is in Cancer and very close to the horizon.

Saturn  climbs was at opposition on the 10th, when it was visible all night long. Saturn is below Jupiter and just below the "handle" of the "teapot of Sagittarius. It is best for
 telescopic viewing from just around 9 pm local time until the early morning and is highest above the northern horizon, when it is idea for telescopic imaging, shortly after midnight.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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Monday, July 01, 2019

 

Live Wecasts/streaming of the Total Solar eclipse July 2, 2019

On July 2 (UT, Early morning July 3 in Australia) there is a total eclipse of the Sun which will effectively be only seen in south America. (image credit, NASA eclipse website).

While Australia will not see this there are a number of webcams and live sterams you can watch it on.

The ESO live stream from LaSilla begins 19:15 UT (5:15 am  AEST July 3) almost one and a half hours before totality.
https://www.eso.org/public/events/astro-evt/solareclipse2019/

The exploratorium will webcast from Chile at a similar time
https://www.exploratorium.edu/video/total-solar-eclipse-live-july-2-2019

Time and date will  livestream the eclipse on YouTube beginning at 1900 UT (5:00 am AEST July 3)

The the Space.com home page will also have live eclipse views.SO you have a lot to pick from to view as you enjoy your morning coffee.

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The Sky This Week - Thursday July 4 to Thursday July 11

The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday July 9. Mars is visible low in the evening twilight with Mercury above it.  On July 4 the thin crescent Moon is close to Mars, forming a triangle with Mercury. Jupiter is easily visible as the brightest object in the evening skies. Mercury falls back towards the horizon and is close to Mars on the 8th. Saturn climbs higher in the late evening skies and is at opposition on the 10th.  Venus is lost in the twilight glow.

The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday July 9.The Moon is at perigee, when it is closest to Earth, on the 5th.

Evening sky on Thursday, July 4  as seen looking north-west from Adelaide at 18:12 ACST (60 minutes after sunset). Mars is close to the thin crescent Moon, making a triangle with Mercury.






Similar views will be seen throughout Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes after sunset, click to embiggen).


Sky at 20:00 ACST on Wednesday, July 10 looking east as seen from Adelaide. Jupiter is just after opposition, and high above the eastern horizon with Saturn below. Saturn is at opposition on this date.

The left upper insert inset shows the telescopic view of Jupiter at this time. Io is crossing the face of Jupiter. The left lower insert is the telescopic view of Saturn at the same magnification.


Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time, click to embiggen.





Venus is lost in the morning twilight and will return to the evening sky in September.

Mercury  sinks towards the horizon in the evening twilight, heading towards Mars, but is still best seen with a level, clear horizon. On July 4 Mercury makes a thin triangle with Mars and the thin crescent Moon. On the 8th Mars and Mercury are at their closest.

Jupiter  Jupiter was  at opposition, when it was biggest and brightest as seen from Earth, on June the 11th. However it is well worth observing for some time after opposition. Jupiter is easily visible as the brightest object in the north-eastern/northern sky (aside from the Moon) and is located just below the distinctive constellation of Scorpius and the bright red star Antares. It is visible all evening long and is a good telescope target in the evening, being highest above the northern horizon around 10:30 pm local time.

Mars is in Cancer below brighter Mercury, during the week Mercury comes closer to Mars  being closest on the 8th. On July 4 Mars is close to the thin crescent Moon, making a triangle with Mercury. Mars and the Moon will be visible together in wide field telescopic eyepieces if your scope can poit close to the horizon.

Saturn  climbs higher in the evening sky, and is at opposition on the 10th, when it is visible all night long. Saturn is below Jupiter and just below the "handle" of the "teapot of Sagittarius. It is best for telescopic viewing from just around 9 pm local time until the early morning and is highest above the northern horizon, when it is idea for telescopic imaging, shortly after midnight.

Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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