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Monday, April 12, 2021

 

ThursdayApril 15 to Thursday April 22

The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday, April 20. Saturn and Jupiter are readily visible in the morning sky.  Dimming Mars is readily visible in the early evening skies beyond the tips of the horns of Taurus the Bull.On the 17th Mars is quite close to the crescent Moon. Can you see the Emu in the sky?

The First Quarter Moon is Tuesday, April 20. 

Morning sky on Saturday
April 17 showing the eastern sky as seen from Adelaide  at 5:16am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). Saturn and Jupiter form a line in the morning sky.
 
The insets shows the telescopic views of Jupiter and Saturn at this time. 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen.
 
 
Whole sky at 19:14 ACST  (90 minutes after
sunset), on Saturday, April 17 as seen from 
Adelaide
 
 

  

Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). click to embiggen.

Evening sky at 19:14 ACST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Tuesday, April 13  facing north-west as seen from Adelaide. Mars is within binocular and wide field eyepiece distance of the crescent Moon. .  
 
 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset), click to embiggen.
 
 
 
The south-eastern horizon, around 11:00 pm local time in Australia. Can you see the Emu? Click to embiggen.

If you are out camping this school holidays, now that the Moon is just waxing and the evening sky is dark it is a great time to find the constellation of the Emu. Now you are saying: ‘Emu – but there is no Emu!’ However, the Emu is one of the indigenous Australian constellations. And interestingly, it is a "dark" constellation, one that is made up entirely of dark dust lanes!

"Dark" constellations are unique to the Southern hemisphere. In South America they had the constellations of the Tinamou (and Emu relative) and two llamas making up the constellation the Indigenous Australians called the Emu*.


See the Emu now?

The Emu consists of the Coal Sack, the dark dust cloud that nestles in the crook of the Southern Cross (the head of the Emu), and a dark dust lane that stars near the Pointers (alpha and beta Centauri) and runs down to the curl of stars that forms the body of Scorpio. This is the neck and wings of the Emu. A second dark dust lane forms the lower body and legs.

Being made of dark dust lanes, it is almost impossible to see in any city. However, here in the suburbs, if I let my eyes adapt for several minutes I can make it out. And of course in the country it is almost immediately obvious. Once you spot it, you will wonder why you never saw the Emu before. The best time too look currently is about 11 pm when the Emu is nearly vertical and easier to recognise. You can look earlier from 9-10 pm, but the legs are cut off and it might be harder to recognise.

*There is more than one Emu, another Indigenous group identifies Orion as an Emu.
 
Mercury is  lost in the twilight.

Venus is lost in the twilight

Mars is readily visible in the evening sky above the north-western horizon in the early evening. Mars is just beyond the stars that form the tips of the horns of Taurus the Bull. On the 17th Mars is just two finger-widths (about 2 degrees) from the crescent Moon. This means Mars is within binocular and wide field eyepiece distance of the crescent Moon.
   
Jupiter is climbing higher in the morning sky forming a line with Saturn.
 
 Saturn is climbing higher in the morning sky and is easily seen above Jupiter .
 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/ 



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Thursday, April 08, 2021

 

Southern Skywatch April 2021 edition is now out!

Evening sky at 19:20 ACST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Tuesday, April 13  facing north-west as seen from Adelaide. Mars is between that stars that form the tips of the horns of Taurus the Bull.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset), click to embiggen.
 
 
The April edition of Southern Skywatch is now up.

 In April most of the planetary action is in the morning.

6 April; Saturn close to the crescent Moon in the morning. 7 April; Saturn, Jupiter and the crescent Moon form a triangle in the morning. 8 April; Jupiter above the crescent Moon in the morning. April 11; crescent Moon above Mercury low in the twilight. April 13; Mars is almost directly between Elnath and Zeta Tauri, which forms the tip of the other horns of Tarus the Bull. April 15; Moon at Apogee. April 17; Mars and crescent Moon close. April 27th; Mars passes through the outskirts of the open cluster M35. April 28; Moon at perigee (perigee Full Moon, "super" Moon).

 Mercury is low in the morning sky this month and lost in twilight mid month. On the 11th the thin crescent Moon is just above Mercury low in the twilight, a mere 3 finger-widths above the horizon, 30 minutes before sunrise. You will need a level unobscured horizon and possibly binoculars to see this.

Venus is too close to the sun to see. It will return to the evening sky in May.

Mars  is close to the crescent Moon on the 17th. On the 13th Mars is almost directly between Elnath and Zeta Tauri, which form the tips of the horns of Taurus the Bull. Mars passes through the outskirts of the open cluster M35 on the 27th. You will need binoculars to see the encounter at its best.

 Jupiter is rising higher in the morning sky, in a line with Saturn and Mercury early in the month. On the 7th the crescent Moon is between Saturn and Jupiter, then on the 8th the thin crescent Moon is below Jupiter, with Saturn above.

Saturn climbs higher in the morning sky. On the 6th the Moon, Saturn and Jupiter from a line, then on the 7th the crescent Moon is between Saturn and Jupiter finally on the 8th the thin crescent Moon is below Jupiter forming a line with Jupiter and Saturn.

Apogee April 15; Moon at perigee April 28 (1 am 11 hours after Full so a super moon, May will be better).

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Monday, April 05, 2021

 

ThursdayApril 8 to Thursday April 15

The New Moon is Monday, April 12. Saturn and Jupiter are readily visible in the morning sky. On the 6th The Moon, Saturn and Jupiter from a line, then on the 7th the crescent Moon is between Saturn and Jupiter finally on the 8th the thin crescent Moon is below Jupiter. Mercury is low in the dawn sky. On the 11th the thin crescent Moon and Mercury are close together low in the morning twilight. Dimming Mars is readily visible in the early evening skies between the tips of the horns of Taurus the Bull.

The New Moon is Monday, April 12.The moon is at apogee, when it is furthest from the Earth, on the 15th.

Morning sky on Thursday April 8 showing the eastern sky as seen from Adelaide  at 5:10 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). Saturn and Jupiter form a line with the crescent Moon in the morning sky.
 
The insets shows the telescopic views of Jupiter and Saturn at this time. 
 
 Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen.
 

Morning sky on Sunday April 11 showing the eastern sky as seen from Adelaide  at 6:10 am ACST (30 minutes before sunrise). Mercury is below the crescent Moon in the morning sky low in the twilight. 
 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (30 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen.
 
 
Whole sky at 19:21 ACST  (90 minutes after
sunset), on Saturday, April 10 as seen from 
Adelaide
 
 

  

Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). click to embiggen.

Evening sky at 19:20 ACST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Tuesday, April 13  facing north-west as seen from Adelaide. Mars is between that stars that form the tips of the horns of Taurus the Bull.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset), click to embiggen.
 
 
Mercury is  slowly moving towards the horizon and will become even harder to see this week as it goes deeper into the twilight glow.  On the 11th it is below the thin crescent Moon low in the dawn twilight. You will need a level unobstructed horizon to see this.

Venus is lost in the twilight

Mars is readily visible in the evening sky above the north-western horizon in the early evening. Mars is near the Hyades is traveling down the horn of Taurus the Bull.On the 13th Mars is between that stars that form the tips of the horns of Taurus the Bull.
   
Jupiter is climbing higher in the morning twilight forming a line with Saturn and  Mercury. On the 8th the thin crescent Moon is below Jupiter.
 
 Saturn is climbing higher in the morning twilight and is easily seen above Jupiter .
 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/ 


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Monday, March 29, 2021

 

ThursdayApril 1 to Thursday April 8

The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday, April 4 and daylight savings ends. Saturn and Jupiter are readily visible in the morning sky. On the 6th The Moon, Saturn and Jupiter from a line, then on the 7th the crescent Moon is between Saturn and Jupiter finally on the 8th the thin crescent Moon is below Jupiter. Mercury is low in the dawn sky. Dimming Mars is readily visible in the early evening skies near the Hyades and is traveling down the horn of  Taurus the Bull.

The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday, April 4 and daylight savings ends.

Morning sky on Wednesday April 7 showing the eastern sky as seen from Adelaide  at 5:38 am ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). Saturn,  Jupiter form a triangle with the crescent Moon in the morning sky with Mercury just rising in the dawn. 
 
The inset shows the telescopic view of Jupiter at this time, with Io coming out from behind Jupiter. 
 
 Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen.
 
 
Whole sky at 20:32 ACDST  (90 minutes after
sunset), on Saturday, April 3 as seen from 
Adelaide
 
 

  

Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). click to embiggen.

Evening sky at 20:32 ACDST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Saturday, April 3  facing north-west as seen from Adelaide. Mars is the third brightest object above the north-western horizon aside from Aldebaran and Betelgeuse.  
 
 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset), click to embiggen.
 
 
Mercury is  slowly moving towards the horizon and will become harder to see this week as it enters the twilight glow. 

Venus is lost in the twilight

Mars is readily visible in the evening sky above the north-western horizon in the early evening. Mars is now the third brightest object low above the north-western horizon after nearby Aldebaran and Betelgeuse. Mars is near the Hyades is traveling down the horn of Taurus the Bull.
   
Jupiter is climbing higher in the morning twilight forming a line with Saturn and  Mercury. On the 6th The Moon, Saturn and Jupiter from a line, then on the 7th the crescent Moon is between Saturn and Jupiter finally on the 8th the thin crescent Moon is below Jupiter.
 
 Saturn is climbing higher in the morning twilight and is above Jupiter and Mercury.
On the 6th The Moon, Saturn and Jupiter from a line, then on the 7th the crescent Moon is between Saturn and Jupiter finally on the 8th the thin crescent Moon is below Jupiter.
 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/ 


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Monday, March 22, 2021

 

Thursday March 25 to Thursday April 1

The Full Moon is Monday, March 29. This scrapes in as Perigee (super) Moon. Saturn and Jupiter are readily visible in the morning sky with Mercury low in the dawn sky. Dimming Mars is readily visible in the early evening skies near the Hyades and is traveling down the horn of  Taurus the Bull.

The Full Moon is Monday, March 29.  The Moon is at perigee, when it is closest to Earth, on the 30th. This scrapes in as Perigee (super) Moon. however the April and May ones are better.


Morning sky on Satur
day,  March 27 showing the eastern sky as seen from Adelaide  at 6:30 am ACDST (60 minutes before sunrise). Saturn, Mercury and Jupiter form a line in the morning sky with Mercury lowering in the dawn. 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen.
 
 
Whole sky at 20:39 ACDST  (90 minutes after
sunset), on Monday, March 30 as seen from 
Adelaide
 
 
The full Moon is just rising, the Moon will be at perigee the next day at 15:30 ACDST.

  

Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). click to embiggen.

Evening sky at 20:41 ACDST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Saturday, March 27  facing north-west as seen from Adelaide. Mars is the second brightest object above the north-western horizon aside from Aldebaran.  
 
 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset), click to embiggen.
 
 
Mercury is brightening in the early twilight and starts the week below Jupiter forming a line with Saturn and Jupiter. It is slowly moving towards the horizon and will become harder to see this week. 

Venus is lost in the twilight

Mars is readily visible in the evening sky above the north-western horizon in the early evening. Mars is now the second brightest object low above the north-western horizon after nearby Aldebaran. Mars is near the Hyades is traveling down the horn of Taurus the Bull.
   
Jupiter is climbing higher in the morning twilight forming a line with Saturn and  Mercury.
 
 Saturn is climbing higher in the morning twilight and is above Jupiter and Mercury.
 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEDST, Western sky at 10 pm AEDST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/ 



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Monday, March 15, 2021

 

Thursday March 18 to Thursday March 25

The First Quarter Moon is Monday, March 22. Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury are readily visible in the morning sky. Dimming Mars is readily visible in the early evening skies near the Hyades and begins to travel down the horn of  Taurus the Bull. Mars is close to the crescent Moon on the 19th.

The First Quarter Moon is Monday, March 22.


Morning sky on Satur
day,  March 20 showing the eastern sky as seen from Adelaide  at 6:24 am ACDST (60 minutes before sunrise). Saturn, Mercury and Jupiter form a line in the morning sky. 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen.
 
 
Whole sky at 20:52 ACDST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Saturday, March 20 as seen from 
Adelaide.

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). click to embiggen.

Evening sky at 20:53 ACDST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Friday, March 19  facing north-west as seen from Adelaide. Mars is the brightest object aside from the Moon low above the north-western horizon.  
 
 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset), click to embiggen.
 
 
Mercury is brightening in the early twilight and starts the week below Jupiter forming a line with Saturn and Jupiter. It is slowly moving towards the horizon but will be easily visible this week. 

Venus is lost in the twilight

Mars is readily visible in the evening sky above the north-western horizon in the early evening. Mars is the brightest object low above the north-western horizon aside from the nearby Moon. near the Hyades and begins to travel down the horn of  Taurus the Bull. Mars is close to the crescent Moon on the 19th.
   
Jupiter is climbing higher in the morning twilight forming a line with Saturn and  Mercury.
 
 Saturn is climbing higher in the morning twilight and is above Jupiter and Mercury.
 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEDST, Western sky at 10 pm AEDST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/ 



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Tuesday, March 09, 2021

 

Thursday March 11 to Thursday March 18

The New Moon is Saturday March 13. Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury are visible in the morning. On the 11th the thin crescent Moon forms a triangle with Jupiter and Mercury. Dimming  Mars is readily visible in the early evening skies between the Pleiades and the Hyades and forms a second eye for Taurus the Bull. The asteroid Vesta is (just) visible to the unaided eye in Leo.

The New Moon is Saturday March 13.The Moon is at apogee, when it is furthest from the Earth, on the 18th.

Morning sky on Thursday,  March 11 showing the eastern sky as seen from Adelaide at 6:13 am ACDST (60 minutes before sunrise). Saturn, Mercury and Jupiter form a line in the morning sky with the thin crescent Moon forming a triangle with Jupiter and Mercury. 
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen.
 
 
Whole sky at 21:13 ACDST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Saturday, March 13 as seen from 
Adelaide.

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset). click to embiggen.


Evening sky at 20:55 ACDST  (90 minutes after sunset), on Thursday, March 18  facing north-west as seen from Adelaide. Mars is the brightest object aside from the Moon low above the north-western horizon.
 
 
 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset), click to embiggen.
 
 
The North-east horizon as seen from Adelaide at 23:00 ACDST (10:00 pm non-daylight saving time) showing the location of Vesta (click to embiggen) on Saturday, March 13.
 
The inset shows the approximate binocular view at this time. 
 
Printable spotters maps of the opposition are here

 
Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time.

 
Mercury is brightening in the twilight and starts the week just below Jupiter.  As the week goes on it forms a line with Saturn and Jupiter. On the 11th the thin crescent Moon forms a triangle with Jupiter and Mercury.

Venus is lost in the twilight

Mars is readily visible in the evening sky above the north-western horizon in the early evening. Mars is the brightest object low above the north-western horizon aside from the nearby Moon. Mars is between the Pleiades and the Hyades and forms a second eye for Taurus the Bull.
   
Jupiter is climbing higher in the morning twilight forming a line with Saturn and starts the week very close to Mercury. On the 11th the thin crescent Moon forms a triangle with Jupiter and Mercury.
 
 Saturn is climbing higher in the morning twilight and is above Mercury and Jupiter.
 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEDST, Western sky at 10 pm AEDST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/ 


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