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Wednesday, June 29, 2022

 

Southern Skywatch July 2022 edition is now out!

Morning sky on Friday July 22 as seen from Adelaide at 5:49 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). Mars is close to the crescent moon. 

 

 

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen elsewhere in Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise), click to embiggen. 

The June edition of Southern Skywatch is now up. The planetary action is in the morning sky with The planetary action is mostly in the morning sky with five bright planets, Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Mercury in the morning sky at the beginning of the month, then four for the rest of the month. Saturn also appears in the evening sky, followed by Jupiter and Mercury later in the month. Earth is aphelion, and the Southern Delta Aquarids meteor shower.

July 1; Venus forms a second eye for Taurus the Bull. July 7; First Quarter Moon. July 13; perigee Moon. July 14; Full Moon (best Perigee Moon this year). July 16, Mars near the variable star Mira, which should be at maximum. July 15 (morning 16); Saturn and waning Moon close. July 19; the waning Moon near Jupiter. July 21; Last Quarter Moon. July 22; Mars close to crescent moon. July 26; the thin crescent Moon is beside Venus. July 26; apogee Moon. July 29; New Moon. July 29-30, Southern Delta Aquariids meteor shower. July 30; Mercury close to thin crescent Moon in evening twilight. July 31; Mars and Uranus 2 degrees apart (in same binocular field).

Mercury  is rapidly sinking towards the morning horizon and is really only visible for the first week. It returns to the evening sky later in the month. It is low in the twilight half an hour after sunset in the last week of the month. On July 30 the thin crescent Moon and Mercury are close in the twilight.

Venus starts the month close to Aldebaran, forming a second eye for Taurus the Bull. Venus continues to sink towards the horizon but is readily visible from nautical twilight until dawn.

On the 26th Venus and the thin crescent Moon are close.

Earth is at aphelion on Monday the 4th, when it is furthest from the sun.

Mars is becoming brighter as it nears opposition, it is in an area devoid of bright stars so is readily identifiable. On July 22, Mars is 3° from the crescent Moon. The pair easily seen together in binoculars. On the 31st Mars and Uranus are 2° apart, easily visible together in binoculars (closest on 1 August).

Jupiter climbs higher in the morning sky and is an excellent telescopic object if you can get up that early. On the 18th Jupiter is close to the waning Moon.

Jupiter is rising about midnight on the 1st, and by the end of the month is rising about 10 pm local time, it is still best telescopically in the morning.

Saturnis climbing higher in the evening sky, but remains seen in the morning skies, Saturn will be sufficiently high in the sky to clear a cluttered horizon, but not high enough for good telescopic observation until around mid month. Saturn forms a shallow triangle with delta and gamma Capricorn, which is best from the 25th to 30th. Saturn is at opposition next month. Saturn is rising around 9 pm local time at the beginning of the month and will be rising around6 pm at the end of the month.

On the 15th (morning 16th)the waning Moon is close to Saturn (not spectacularly though).

Moon: May 13; perigee Moon and May 26; apogee Moon

 

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Tuesday, June 28, 2022

 

Thursday June 30 to Thursday June 7

The First Quarter Moon is Thursday, July 7. This is the last week to see the five bright classical planets in a line in the morning sky, Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Mercury. At the beginning of the week Venus makes a second eye for Taurus the Bull.

The First Quarter Moon is Thursday, July 7.

 Morning sky on Thursday June 30 as seen from Adelaide at 6:25 am ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). 

Venus forms second eye for the constellation of Taurus the Bull,  alongside the bright red star Adebaran.




 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen). 

 

Morning sky on Saturday July 2 as seen from Adelaide at 6:25 am ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). 

The five bright classical planets are visible in a line in the morning sky, Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Mercury. (Uranus, Neptune and the Asteroid Vesta are in the line too, but all need at least binoculars to see).

the insets are the telescopic views of the planets at the same magnification at this time.

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise).

 

Evening sky on Thursday June 7 as seen from Adelaide at 18:48 pm ACST (90 minutes after sunset). The first quarter Moon is close to the bright star Spica.

 

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset).

 

Whole sky on Saturday, July 2, 18:43 ACST, 90 minutes after sunset (click to embiggen). The Milky Way stretches across the mid-sky and the centre of the galaxy is coming into view. 

Scorpius is prominent above the South Eastern horizon with the teapot a Sagittarius below. From the Sting of the Scorpion through the teapot there is a wealth of binocular objects to discover.

Between the bright star Canopus and the Southern Cross are another wealth of binocular objects to discover. 

 

  

 Elsewhere in Australia will see a similar view at the equivalent time (90 minutes after sunset). 

 

Mercury is lowering in the morning twilight.This is the last week to see it readily.

Venus is lowering in the morning twilight and at the beginning of the week Venus makes a second eye for Taurus the Bull. .

Mars forms a line with Saturn, Jupiter, Venus and Mercury (and Uranus and Neptune).

Jupiter climbs higher in the morning twilight below Saturn and above Mars.

Saturn climbs away from Mars, Jupiter, and Venus.

 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/


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Friday, June 24, 2022

 

Morning Occultation Of Uranus (WA, NT and FNQ, Saturday 25 June, 2022)

Morning sky on Saturday June 25 as seen from Mt.Isa at 6:22 am AEST just before Uranus disappears behind the bright limb of the Moon. The inset shows the binocular appearance of the Moon and Uranus at this time. Morning sky on Saturday June 25 as seen from Alice Springs at 5:43 am ACST just before Uranus disappears behind the bright limb of the Moon. The inset shows the binocular appearance of the Moon and Uranus at this time. Morning sky on Saturday June 25 as seen from Perth at 4:48 am AWST just after Uranus reappears behind the dark limb of the Moon. The inset shows the binocular appearance of the Moon and Uranus at this time.

Path of the occultation of Uranus 25 June 2022 (24 Jan UT). (cyan=occultation at moonrise/moonset; red dotted=daytime occultation; blue=twilight occultation; white=nighttime occultation). Source IOTA.

On the morning of Saturday June 25 the Moon and and Uranus are very close and an occultation is seen in Western Australia, Northern Territory and Far North Queensland. 

Times for selected cities in these areas are given in the table below, time will be similar for nearby locations. Times in UT for other Australian cities can be found in the tables at the IOTA site



TownNautical twilightCivil twilightDisappearance Bright LimbReappearance Dark LimbHeight
Alice Springs (ACST)6:246:525:456:2923
Darwin (ACST)6:176:445:37
6:51
24
Cairns (AEST)5:556:226:057:0440
Mt Isa (AEST)6:266:546:237:0530
Perth (AWST)6:206:50just above horizon 4:06
4:4816

The northern Territory and northern Western Australia have the best views,  in Far North Queensland Uranus emerges from behind the Moon in daylight, and will be very hard to see. In Perth and Fremantle the Moon is just 3° form the horizon at disappearance, so a very difficult target. 

While Uranus is bright enough to be visible under dark sky condition to the unaided eye,the combination of moonlight and advancing twilight means that binoculars or a small telescope are needed to see Uranus. 



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Tuesday, June 21, 2022

 

Thursday June 23 to Thursday June 30

The New Moon is Wednesday, June 29. The five bright classical planets are visible in a line in the morning sky, Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Mercury. Also present but not visible to the unaided eye are the dwarf planet Pluto, asteroid Vesta, Neptune and Uranus. The Moon climbs down the ladder of planets, being close to Jupiter on the 22nd, very close to Mars on the 23rd, Uranus on the 25th (occultation in WA, NT and FNQ)  and Venus on the 26th.

The New Moon is Wednesday, June 29.

Morning sky on Thursday June 23 as seen from Adelaide at 5:53 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). The crescent Moon is near Mars.The inset shows the binocular appearance of the Moon and Mars at 3:00 am local time.

Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus and Mercury form a line (Uranus, Neptune and the Asteroid Vesta are in the line too, but all need at least binoculars to see). 




 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).

 Morning sky on Saturday June 25 as seen from Adelaide at 5:53 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). The Moon and and Uranus are at their closest (occultation in WA, NT and FNQ). The inset shows the binocular appearance of the Moon and Uranus at this time. Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia except the occulting states at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).

 

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time.

Morning sky on Sunday June 26 as seen from Adelaide at 6:24 am ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). The crescent moon forms a line with Venus, Aldebaran and Mercury, with the Pleiades cluster close by.

 

 

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).

 

Whole sky on Saturday, June 25, 18:43 ACST, 90 minutes after sunset (click to embiggen). Scorpius is prominent above the South Eastern horizon. 

Between the bright star Canopus and the Southern Cross are a wealth of binocular objects to discover. 

 

 

 

 

 Elsewhere in Australia will see a similar view at the equivalent time (90 minutes after sunset). 

 

Mercury is lowering in the morning twilight.

Venus is lowering in the morning twilight and is close to the crescent Moon on the 26th.

Mars forms a line with Saturn, Jupiter, Venus and Mercury (and Uranus and Neptune). Mars is close to the crescent Moon on the 23rd.

Jupiter climbs higher in the morning twilight below Saturn and above Mars. Jupiter is visited by the Moon on the 22nd.

Saturn climbs away from Mars, Jupiter, and Venus.

 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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Wednesday, June 15, 2022

 

Bright ISS Passes Near bright Stars (16-23 June, 2022)

The ISS as seen from Sydney  on the evening of  Monday 20 June at 17:38 AEST. Simulated in Stellarium (the ISS will actually be a bright dot), the white line is the path of the ISS. Click to embiggen.The ISS  as seen from Adelaide on the evening of  Saturday 18 June at 18:43 ACST. Simulated in Stellarium (the ISS will actually be a bright dot), the white line is the path of the ISS, the ISS enters the shadow shortly after. Click to embiggen.The ISS as seen from Perth on the evening of  Tuesday 21 Juneat 17:57 AWST. Simulated in Stellarium (the ISS will actually be a bright dot), the white line is the path of the ISS. Click to embiggen.
All sky chart showing local times from Heavens Above for Monday 20 June for Sydney.All sky chart showing local  times from Heavens Above for Saturday 18 June for Adelaide.All sky chart showing local times from Heavens Above for Tuesday 21 June for Perth. 


If it is not bucketing down rain where you are, over the next few days there are a series of  bright ISS passes in the late evening twilight/early evening. The ISS passes close to the several bright stars. There are also some bright passes where it "winks out" as the ISS enters Earth's shadow. On the 19th from Adelaide the ISS passes through Scorpius.

 
The following tables are from data provided from Heavens Above. Particularly impressive passes are highlighted in yellow, passes entering the shadow in blue.

Passes from Adelaide (ACST)

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
15 Jun-0.819:28:2910°NNW19:28:4812°NNW19:28:4812°NNWvisible
16 Jun-2.218:40:4010°N18:42:5323°NNE18:42:5323°NNEvisible
17 Jun-1.517:53:3610°NNE17:55:1313°NE17:56:5010°Evisible
17 Jun-1.319:28:1910°WNW19:29:4923°WNW19:29:4923°WNWvisible
18 Jun-3.918:39:4910°NW18:43:1186°NE18:43:4460°SEvisible
19 Jun-3.117:51:3610°NNW17:54:4842°NE17:57:3413°ESEvisible
19 Jun-1.019:29:0810°W19:30:2916°WSW19:30:2916°WSWvisible
20 Jun-2.218:40:0310°W18:43:0530°SW18:44:1324°Svisible
21 Jun-3.217:51:1510°WNW17:54:3353°SW17:57:5310°SEvisible
22 Jun-1.318:41:1910°WSW18:43:1114°SSW18:44:2312°Svisible
23 Jun-1.717:51:5210°W17:54:3021°SSW17:57:0810°SSEvisible


Passes from Brisbane (AEST)

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
15 Jun-3.018:22:5410°NNW18:25:5237°NE18:25:5237°NEvisible
16 Jun-2.017:35:2110°N17:37:4618°NE17:39:5711°Evisible
16 Jun-1.019:11:3210°W19:12:5318°W19:12:5318°Wvisible
17 Jun-3.018:22:3910°WNW18:25:5348°SW18:26:5335°Svisible
18 Jun-3.817:34:0810°NW17:37:2977°NE17:40:4910°SEvisible
19 Jun-1.218:23:5010°WSW18:25:5615°SW18:27:3412°Svisible
20 Jun-2.017:34:2610°WNW17:37:2127°SW17:40:1710°SSEvisible


Passes from Darwin (ACT)

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
15 Jun-3.106:06:5427°WSW06:08:1240°NW06:11:2210°NNEvisible
15 Jun-2.019:23:0210°WNW19:25:5828°SW19:28:4811°Svisible
16 Jun-2.305:21:0736°NE05:21:0736°NE05:23:1310°NEvisible

Passes from Hobart (AEST) 

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
17 Jun-1.218:26:1710°NNE18:26:5312°NNE18:26:5312°NNEvisible
18 Jun-1.219:12:3910°NW19:13:4419°NW19:13:4419°NWvisible
19 Jun-2.918:24:3110°NNW18:27:3435°NE18:27:3435°NEvisible
20 Jun-2.117:36:4110°N17:39:1921°NE17:41:1814°Evisible
20 Jun-1.519:12:3010°WNW19:14:1326°W19:14:1326°Wvisible
21 Jun-3.818:23:5710°WNW18:27:2185°SSW18:27:5360°SEvisible
22 Jun-3.517:35:3410°NW17:38:5357°NE17:41:2916°ESEvisible
22 Jun-1.319:12:4710°W19:14:2321°WSW19:14:2321°WSWvisible
23 Jun-2.818:23:5910°W18:27:1239°SSW18:27:5534°Svisible
24 Jun-3.417:35:1610°WNW17:38:3757°SSW17:41:2414°SEvisible
24 Jun-1.019:13:1310°WSW19:14:1816°SW19:14:1816°SWvisible


Passes from Melbourne (AEST)

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
16 Jun-1.319:11:5410°NNW19:12:5317°N19:12:5317°Nvisible
17 Jun-2.018:24:1810°N18:26:4318°NE18:26:5318°NEvisible
18 Jun-1.317:38:1810°NE17:38:2910°NE17:38:4110°ENEvisible
18 Jun-2.519:11:2410°NW19:13:4441°WNW19:13:4441°WNWvisible
19 Jun-3.618:23:0210°NW18:26:2158°NE18:27:3434°ESEvisible
20 Jun-2.617:35:0010°NNW17:38:0030°NE17:41:0210°ESEvisible
20 Jun-1.919:11:4510°W19:14:1327°SW19:14:1327°SWvisible
21 Jun-3.018:22:5410°WNW18:26:1045°SW18:27:5324°SSEvisible
22 Jun-3.717:34:1710°NW17:37:3982°SW17:41:0410°SEvisible
22 Jun-1.219:12:4610°WSW19:14:2315°SSW19:14:2315°SSWvisible
23 Jun-1.718:23:3010°WSW18:26:0921°SSW18:27:5514°SSEvisible
24 Jun-2.317:34:2710°W17:37:2930°SSW17:40:3310°SSEvisible


Passes from Perth (AWST)

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
15 Jun-1.119:30:4810°NW19:31:4518°NW19:31:4518°NWvisible
16 Jun-3.018:42:4210°NNW18:45:4936°NE18:45:4936°NEvisible
17 Jun-2.017:55:0710°N17:57:3319°NE17:59:4911°Evisible
17 Jun-1.319:31:0610°WNW19:32:4522°W19:32:4522°Wvisible
18 Jun-3.318:42:2010°WNW18:45:3856°SW18:46:3937°SSEvisible
19 Jun-3.717:53:5310°NW17:57:1370°NE18:00:2911°SEvisible
19 Jun-0.719:32:4710°WSW19:33:2411°SW19:33:2411°SWvisible
20 Jun-1.518:43:0710°W18:45:3919°SW18:47:0815°Svisible
21 Jun-2.317:53:5910°WNW17:57:0332°SW18:00:0910°SSEvisible
23 Jun-1.117:55:2310°WSW17:57:0513°SSW17:58:4810°Svisible


Passes from Sydney (AEST)

Date Brightness Start Highest point End Pass type
(mag) Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az. Time Alt. Az.
15 Jun-1.418:24:5710°NNE18:25:5214°NNE18:25:5214°NNEvisible
16 Jun-1.019:11:5110°NW19:12:5319°NW19:12:5319°NWvisible
17 Jun-3.618:23:3210°NNW18:26:4956°NE18:26:5356°NEvisible
18 Jun-2.517:35:3510°N17:38:3028°NE17:40:4814°ESEvisible
18 Jun-1.019:12:2510°W19:13:4418°WSW19:13:4418°WSWvisible
19 Jun-2.718:23:2910°WNW18:26:4240°SW18:27:3433°Svisible
20 Jun-3.717:34:5110°NW17:38:1379°SW17:41:1812°SEvisible
21 Jun-1.418:24:2910°WSW18:26:4417°SSW18:27:5314°Svisible
22 Jun-2.017:35:1310°W17:38:0626°SW17:41:0110°SSEvisible
24 Jun-1.117:36:5010°SW17:38:1112°SSW17:39:3310°Svisible

 

When and what you will see is VERY location dependent, so you need to use  Heavens Above  to get site specific predictions for your location, a small difference in location can mean the difference between the ISS passing over a star or planet or missing it completely. 

As always, start looking several minutes before the pass is going to start to get yourself oriented and your eyes dark adapted. Be patient, there may be slight differences in the time of the ISS appearing due to orbit changes not picked up by the predictions. Use the most recent prediction for your site.

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Tuesday, June 14, 2022

 

Thursday June 16 to Thursday June 23

The Last Quarter Moon is Tuesday, June 21. The Earth is at solstice, when the day is shortest, on the21st. The five bright classical planets are visible in a line in the morning sky, Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Mercury. Also present but not visible to the unaided eye are the dwarf planet Pluto, asteroid Vesta, Neptune and Uranus. Mercury is at its highest on the 17th. The Moon climbs down the ladder of planets, being close to Saturn on the 19th and Jupiter on the 22nd.

The Last Quarter Moon is Tuesday, June 21. The Earth is at solstice, when the day is shortest, on the 21st.

Morning sky on Sunday June 19 as seen from Adelaide at 5:52am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). The waning Moon is near Saturn. 

Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus and Mercury form a line (Uranus, Neptune and the Asteroid Vesta are in the line too, but all need at least binoculars to see). 

Over the coming week the waning Moon will visit each of the bright planets and is close to Jupiter on the 22nd.



 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).

 The evening sky on Saturday, June 18 at 23:00 ACST, Saturn forms a triangle with delta and gamma Capricornii, and is close to the waning Moon.

 

 

 

 

 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time.

Whole sky on Saturday, June 18, 18:48 ACST, 90 minutes after sunset (click to embiggen). Scorpius rises above the Eastern horizon. 

Between the bright star Canopus and the Southern Cross are a wealth of binocular objects to discover. 

 Saturday and Sunday you may see a bright ISS pass around this time (bright dot above the northwest). 

 

 

 

 

 Elsewhere in Australia will see a similar view at the equivalent time (90 minutes after sunset). 

 

Mercury is at its highest in the morning twilight.

Venus is lowering in the morning twilight.

Mars forms a line with Saturn, Jupiter, Venus and Mercury (and Uranus and Neptune).

Jupiter climbs higher in the morning twilight below Saturn and above Mars. Jupiter is visited by the Moon on the 22nd.

Saturn climbs away from Mars, Jupiter, and Venus. Saturn is visited by the Moon on the 18/19th.

 
Printable PDF maps of the Eastern sky at 10 pm AEST, Western sky at 10 pm AEST. For further details and more information on what's up in the sky, see Southern Skywatch.


 

Star Map via Virtual sky. Use your mouse to scroll around and press 8 when your pointer is in the map to set to the current time.

Cloud cover predictions can be found at SkippySky.

Here is the near-real time satellite view of the clouds (day and night) http://satview.bom.gov.au/

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Wednesday, June 08, 2022

 

All Five bright Classical Planets in the Morning sky in rare line-up (10-30 June, 2022)

Morning sky on Sunday June 12 as seen from Adelaide at 5:50 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus and Mercury form a line (Uranus, Neptune and the Asteroid Vesta are in the line too, but all need at least binoculars to see). Venus and Uranus are at their closest.The inset shows the binocular appearance of  Venus and Uranus at this time. Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen). Morning sky on Sunday June 19 as seen from Adelaide at 5:52am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). The waning Moon is near Saturn.


Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).
Morning sky on Wedensday June 22 as seen from Adelaide at 5:53 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). The waning Moon is near Jupiter.


Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).
Morning sky on Thursday June 23 as seen from Adelaide at 5:53 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). The crescent Moon is near Mars.The inset shows the binocular appearance of the Moon and Mars at 3:00 am local time. Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).Morning sky on Saturday June 25 as seen from Adelaide at 5:53 am ACST (90 minutes before sunrise). The Moon and and Uranus are at their closest (occultation in WA, NT and FNQ). The inset shows the binocular appearance of the Moon and Uranus at this time. Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia except the occulting states at the equivalent local time (90 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).Morning sky on Sunday June 26 as seen from Adelaide at 6:24 am ACST (60 minutes before sunrise). The crescent moon forms a line with Venus, Aldebaran and Mercury, with the Pleiades cluster close by.

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise, click to embiggen).


Over the next three weeks you will be able to see a rather rare sight, if you have clear morning skies. All 5 bright classical planets are lined up in the order they are from the Sun. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. In February 2016 we also had 5 bright planets in the morning skies but the lineup was Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars and Jupiter. We have to go back 21 December 2004 to have all 5 planets in the morning sky in solar order. 

Also, unlike the other times we had all the bright classical planets together in the morning, we also have all the other planets (Uranus, Neptune), the Dwarf planet Pluto and the Asteroid 4 Vesta. These are not is solar system order. 

To make up for this on the 12th we have a close approach of Venus and Uranus. The Moon joins the line-up from the 19th, and we have lots of nice close Moon approaches, with the Moon and Uranus being close on the 25th and occultations in Cairns (Dawn), Darwin, Alice Springs and Perth. 

On the 26th Venus and the thin crescent Moon are close, the Pleiades and Aldebaran and Mercury make this an attractive sight. On the 27th the thin crescent Moon forms  a rectangle with Mercury, Venus and Aldebaran. On the 30th Venus forms a second eye for Taurus the Bull.

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